Indian Journal of Urology
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year
: 2022  |  Volume : 38  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 184--190

What should urologists know about Pseudojournals and open access publishing? A narrative review of the literature


Rahul Jena1, Aditya Prakash Sharma2, Kumar Madhavan3, Ashwin Narasimha Sridhar4, Kalpesh Parmar2, Nikita Shrivastava1 
1 Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Urology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Urology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India
4 Department of Urology, University College London Hospital, London, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Aditya Prakash Sharma
Department of Urology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
India

Introduction: The majority of the open access publishing allows the researchers to publish their articles for a fee and at the same time enables the readers to access the research without paying the expensive journal subscription charges. Under the garb of open access publishing, predatory journals run a scam to dupe the researchers of money. This study was conducted to highlight the characteristics of pseudojournals and increase the awareness about their modus operandi. Methods: The email inboxes of 3 academic urologists (APS, AS, and KP) were searched for emails soliciting articles for open access journals. A list of all such journals was compiled. These journals were checked for metrics from the Journal Citation Reports and the Scimago Journal Rankings. All these journals were then cross-checked with the available whitelists and blacklists. Features pointing toward a pseudo journal were identified as red flag signs for these journals and were noted. A literature search was performed on open access publishing and predatory journals, and the salient points were noted. A checklist of red flag signs was compiled. Results: A total of 71 emails soliciting article submissions from 68 journals were received by the three urologists (APS, AS, KP). Of these, 54 were highly suggestive of being a pseudojournal, 5 journals were operating in the gray zone between genuine open access journals and outright predatory journals, and 9 were genuine open access journals. A total of 33 articles on predatory journals were reviewed after the literature search as per the PRISMA guidelines. The red flag signs identified along with the literature review were used to create the SAFEiMAP checklist, which can be used to identify predatory journals. Conclusion: Predatory journals have infiltrated the whitelists, and the indexing databases like PubMed and no blacklist is all-inclusive. Understanding the concept and the types of open access publishing gives the researchers a better idea on how to differentiate fake journals from the genuine ones. Using a checklist will help to identify the red flag signs of such journals and identify those journals that operate in the gray zone.


How to cite this article:
Jena R, Sharma AP, Madhavan K, Sridhar AN, Parmar K, Shrivastava N. What should urologists know about Pseudojournals and open access publishing? A narrative review of the literature.Indian J Urol 2022;38:184-190


How to cite this URL:
Jena R, Sharma AP, Madhavan K, Sridhar AN, Parmar K, Shrivastava N. What should urologists know about Pseudojournals and open access publishing? A narrative review of the literature. Indian J Urol [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 13 ];38:184-190
Available from: https://www.indianjurol.com/article.asp?issn=0970-1591;year=2022;volume=38;issue=3;spage=184;epage=190;aulast=Jena;type=0