Indian Journal of Urology
CASE REPORT
Year
: 2002  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 172--173

Urethral cancer in a patient on CIC: A case report


Ajay Kanbur, Arundhati Kanbur, Nisar Ansari 
 Department of Urology & Internal Medicine, Shivneri Hospital, Thane, India

Correspondence Address:
Ajay Kanbur
Shivneri Hospital, Agra Road, Thane - 400 602
India




How to cite this article:
Kanbur A, Kanbur A, Ansari N. Urethral cancer in a patient on CIC: A case report.Indian J Urol 2002;18:172-173


How to cite this URL:
Kanbur A, Kanbur A, Ansari N. Urethral cancer in a patient on CIC: A case report. Indian J Urol [serial online] 2002 [cited 2021 Sep 17 ];18:172-173
Available from: https://www.indianjurol.com/text.asp?2002/18/2/172/37633


Full Text

 Case Report



A 73-year-old male presented with narrow stream and a perineal wound. Following a TURP (1992), he underwent optical urethrotomy for bulbar stricture (1996) and was on a short-term CIC using Tiemann catheter. He had a left ne­phrectomy scar (1998). He continued CIC whenever his stream worsened, without consulting his physician.

Five months ago, he developed a perineal abscess, re­quiring surgical drainage. Soon, a sinus developed but failed to heal despite medication and suprapubic cysto­stomy. Within fifteen days of diversion, a fungating mass replaced the sinus [Figure 1] with palpable left inguinal node.

Biopsy of sinus edge and FNAC of node revealed a well­differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Fistulogram re­vealed an irregular tract leading to a distorted bulb [Figure 2]. Haemogram, Chest X-rays and abdominal CT scans were normal.

Cystoscopy revealed an irregular hard expanded bulb, with leakage of irrigant through the sinus. Bladder could not be entered.

Patient refused radical surgery, and opted local exci­sion with life-long suprapubic catheter. At operation, the bulbar mass, extending into left ischio-rectal fossa was excised. Proximal bulb was disconnected. Histology con­firmed squamous cell carcinoma with metaplasia in sur­rounding urethra.

 Comment



Primary male urethral cancers are rare, three-fourths be­ing squamous cell carcinoma. [1] They masquerade as peri­neal abscesses. [2] Medline search of a possible association of long term CIC and urethral cancer yielded no results. In our case, precise duration of CIC is unknown and, re­peated trauma is probably responsible. Males on long-term CIC should be observed for possible signs of urethral can­cers.

References

1Johnson DE, Swanson DA, von Eschenbach AC. Tumours of the Genitourinary tract. In : Tanagho EA. McAninch JW (eds.). Gen­eral Urology. 12 th edn. Prentice-Hall 1988: 19: 330-434.
2Singla SL. Sultania NK, Chitkara N, Singh U, Singh B. Peri-ure­thral abscess - a rare presentation of urethral carcinoma. J Indian Med Assoc 1997: 95: 90.